• Menetekel: The Arm of the Almighty in the 20th Century, 1980

    Cedarwood / Bronze Box, Arm: 115 x 41 cm, Box: 51 cm x 64 cm x 25.5 cm, Imogen Stuart Collection

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    Wood Hands
  • Stations of the Cross, 1981-82

    Teak, c. 60 cm x 15 cm, Our Lady of Mount Carmel, Firhouse, Dublin

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  • Church Interior: Our Lady's Shrine, 1982

    Wood, Granite, Terracotta, Various Sizes, St. Stephen's Church, Killiney, Co. Dublin

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  • Church Interior, 1983

    Granite, Steel, Alloy, Bronze, Oak, Various Sizes, Our Lady Mother of the Church Parish Church, Castleknock, Co. Dublin

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    Church interior- Our Lady Mother of the Church Parish Church, Castleknock, Co. Dublin
  • Hand, 1983

    Granite, 54 cm x 28 cm x 13 cm, AIB Collection

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    Stone Hands
  • I and Thou, 1983

    Bronze & Marble, 51 cm x 9 cm x 13 cm, Private Collection

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  • Self-Portrait, 1983

    Sheet Bronze, Life-size, National Self-Portrait Collection, University of Limerick

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    Metal Portraits
  • St. Oliver Plunkett (relief), 1984

    Bronze, 61cm Diameter, Propaganda Fide College, Rome

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    Metal
  • Crucifix, 1984

    Bronze, 338 cm x 210 cm, Armagh Cathedral, Co. Armagh

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  • Sedilia, 1986

    Oak, Size N/A, Honan Chapel, University College, Cork

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  • Monument to Pope John Paul II, 1986

    Bronze, 184 cm x 123 cm x 276.6 cm, New Library, Maynooth College, Co. Kildare

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  • Maquette for Penal Cross, 1988

    Bronze, 10 cm H, Private Collection

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  • Penal Cross, 1988

    Oregon Pine, 538 cm H, Lough Derg Basilica, Co. Donegal

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  • Meditation Beehive, 1989

    Cedarwood, 246 cm x 246 cm x 2276.5 cm, Imogen Stuart Collection (on loan to Heritage Museum, Knock, Co. Mayo)

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    “When the Roman Empire collapsed, culture and learning were kept alive by small, scattered communities of monks. The most distinctive form of habitation which they evolved was the beehive cell, a unique personal vehicle for seclusion and simple peace. Remains of these structures are still to be seen in Western Europe, particularly on the west coast of Ireland.

    Now, a thousand years later, I have tried to recreate the beehive cell. In an increasingly chaotic world, it offers a personal centre for spiritual reflection and renewal. This beehive meditation room was built of cedarwood, an extremely durable timber which was already used in biblical times. Every detail is hand-finished, from the inside and outside walls to the separate items. Traditional wood-joints have been used instead of nails. The door runs on a track and the door-handle is functional as well as decorative. The window and skylight are made of hand-cast glass, the leading in the former being in the shape of the old Irish St Brigid’s Cross.”

    - Imogen Stuart

  • Arch of Peace & Fountain, 1989

    Travertine Stone, 368.5 cm x 123 cm x 369 cm, Market Square, Co. Cavan

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